University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute Breaks Ground on Hackerman-Patz House

For immediate release: June 17, 2014

Facility Will Provide Home-Away-From-Home for Families Facing Extended Stays

Baltimore, MD – Families of patients at the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute may face extended stays away from home while their loved one spends weeks - or even months - receiving care. Soon these families may be more comfortable thanks to Willard Hackerman, the late Baltimore businessman, and his wife, Lillian Patz Hackerman. The rehabilitation hospital will break ground today on the latest Hackerman-Patz House, a facility designed to be a "home-away-from-home" for patients’ families, offering affordable lodging along with the supportive community environment of others facing similar situations.

"We know that patients do better when they have their families nearby to provide love and support. However, many of our patients come from other parts of Maryland and out of state to receive care following a stroke, brain injury or other illness. Unfortunately, family members may face lengthy drives or extended stays in a hotel," explains Michael Jablonover, MD, chief executive officer of the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute and clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine.

He adds, "We are so grateful to the Hackerman-Patz family for their gift that will allow our families to have comfortable and affordable lodging within walking distance to the hospital."

Hackerman-Patz House Artist rendering of the Hackerman-Patz House

The UM Rehab & Ortho building will be the seventh Hackerman-Patz House in the Baltimore area. Hackerman, former CEO of The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company who passed away earlier this year, and his wife Lillian Patz Hackerman donated $2 million for the construction of the new house.

"Willard Hackerman believed in the power of family. He and his wife built these homes so families could be with a loved one facing illness. Mr. Hackerman knew of and approved the plans for this latest facility, and he would be thrilled that we will soon be able to offer this comforting environment to families at the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute," says Tim Regan, president and chief executive officer of The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.

The UM Rehab & Ortho house will initially feature 10 private rooms with capacity for 10 additional rooms on the upper floor. There will be a kitchen and laundry as well as a backyard patio and great room for families to gather.

"One of the hallmarks of the Hackerman-Patz Houses is the community atmosphere they foster, which may be particularly comforting for families of patients at the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute, many of whom are recovering from a sudden traumatic injury after being treated at the R Adams Shock Trauma Center at the University of Maryland," says Robert Chrencik, president and CEO of the University of Maryland Medical System.

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company expects to complete initial construction of the house in 2015. The University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute will raise additional funds to finish the interior as well as to operate and maintain the home. That, in turn, will keep guest costs lower for families, such as the family of 26-year-old Shawna Deloney who will share their story at the groundbreaking event.

Deloney, of Tulsa, Oklahoma, suffered a traumatic brain injury in July 2012 and needed intensive rehabilitation. After researching facilities that could provide the best care for Deloney’s condition, her family decided to come to Baltimore two months later for treatment at the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute. For weeks, Deloney's parents, Margaret and Frank Burley, stayed at a nearby hotel and eventually moved to Maryland so their daughter could continue to receive the care she needed.

"The story of Shawna Deloney and her family illustrates the tremendous need for a facility like the Hackerman-Patz House at the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute. Patients come from across the country to receive the most-advanced rehabilitation and orthopaedic care here, and we are so appreciative that we will soon have a Hackerman-Patz House for them on our campus," says Davis V.R. Sherman, chairman of the board of directors for the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute.

The 144-bed University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute is the largest inpatient rehabilitation hospital and provider of rehabilitation services in Maryland. Patients make the transition to rehabilitation after recovering from stroke, traumatic injury, orthopaedic surgery and other debilitating conditions.

The University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute is part of the University of Maryland Medical System, a 12-hospital system of academic, community and specialty hospitals. For more information on the University of Maryland Rehabilitation & Orthopaedic Institute, go to www.UMRehabOrtho.org